Last edited by Kiganris
Monday, July 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes. found in the catalog.

Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes.

Peter Humphry Greenwood

Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes.

by Peter Humphry Greenwood

  • 210 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by British Museum (Natural History) in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Osteoglossiformes.,
  • Mormyriformes.,
  • Muscles.,
  • Branchial arch.,
  • Hyoid bone.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 54-55.

    SeriesBulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Zoology, v. 22, no. 1
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL1 .B75 vol. 22, no. 1, QL639 .B75 vol. 22, no. 1
    The Physical Object
    Pagination55 p.
    Number of Pages55
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5336725M
    LC Control Number72190081

    The hyoid bone moves during swallowing as a result of suprahyoid muscle contraction. Hyoid movement is required for adequate opening of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and is readily measured from a videofluoroscopic dynamic swallow study. 7,8 The timing and extent of hyoid elevation were included in the analysis. In addition, the. The cranium (skull) is the skeletal structure of the head that supports the face and protects the is subdivided into the facial bones and the brain case, or cranial vault (Figure ).The facial bones underlie the facial structures, form the nasal cavity, enclose the eyeballs, and support the teeth of the upper and lower jaws.

    2Division of Fishes, National Museum of Natural History, Washington D.C. , USA skull in lateral view and copula and right ventral gill arches in ventral view, reproduced from Müller (). Note presence of only four gill arches. gill arch therefore potentially has bearing on the identity of that arch, and Edgeworth’s (   The infrahyoid muscles are responsible for the positioning of the hyoid bone along with the suprahyoid muscles. They play an active role in swallowing and the movement of the larynx. More specifically, all infrahyoid muscles (except the sternothyroid) depress the hyoid. The sternothyroid depresses the larynx whereas the thyrohyoid elevates it.

    The hyoid bone is shaped like a horseshoe, and is suspended from the tips of the styloid processes of the temporal bones by the stylohyoid ligaments. It consists of five segments, viz., a body, two greater cornua, and two lesser cornua.: The Body or Basihyal (corpus oss. hyoidei).—The body or central part is of a quadrilateral form. Its anterior surface (Fig. ) is convex and directed. Quiz: Hyoid Bone Previous Hyoid Bone. Next Vertebral Column. Quiz: What is Anatomy and Physiology? Atoms, Molecules, Ions, and Bonds Quiz: Atoms, Molecules, Ions, and Bonds Removing #book# from your Reading List will also remove any bookmarked pages associated with this title.


Share this book
You might also like
Appeal

Appeal

The Part-Time Job Book

The Part-Time Job Book

Demographic and labour force structure in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

Demographic and labour force structure in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

George Spafford (1818-1893), commission agent - a middle man in the 19th century cotton trade.

George Spafford (1818-1893), commission agent - a middle man in the 19th century cotton trade.

Series Secunda Vol.25 Opera Omnia Mech. XVI

Series Secunda Vol.25 Opera Omnia Mech. XVI

Food science.

Food science.

Whats It Like to Be a Teacher (Whats it like to be a)

Whats It Like to Be a Teacher (Whats it like to be a)

Mason decoys

Mason decoys

Designs and methods for youth-led research

Designs and methods for youth-led research

Labour economics

Labour economics

Invitations to the Dance

Invitations to the Dance

Connecticut Facts & Factivities Reproducible Activities (Carole Marsh Connecticut Books)

Connecticut Facts & Factivities Reproducible Activities (Carole Marsh Connecticut Books)

Bazaar Bestsellers #9

Bazaar Bestsellers #9

Legends from Indian history

Legends from Indian history

yeoman in Tudor and Stuart England.

yeoman in Tudor and Stuart England.

Stalin and the Lubianka

Stalin and the Lubianka

Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes by Peter Humphry Greenwood Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes. [Peter Humphry Greenwood].

Author of The fishes of Uganda, Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes by Peter Humphry Greenwood 1 edition - first published in Not in Library. Neogene fossil fishes from the Lake Albert-Lake Edward Rift (Zaire).

Greenwood PH. Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes. Bull Brit Mus Nat Hist (Zool) ; – Greenwood PH.

Notes on the anatomy and classification of elopomorph fishes. Bull Br Mus Nat Hist (Zool) ; – Tchernavin by: (). Homologies between different adductor mandibulae sections of teleostean fishes, with a special regard to catfishes (Teleostei: Siluriformes).

Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes. Introduction: zebrafish as a system to Author: Rui Diogo, Yaniv Hinits and Simon M Hughes. Late larval musculature of zebrafish head. Ventral (A) and dorsal (B) views of the cephalic muscles of d zebrafish larvae ( mm TL) and lateral (C) and ventral (D) views of the cephalic.

Greenwood PH () Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes. Bull Br Mus (Nat Hist) Zool 1–55 Google Scholar Greenwood PH () Interrelationships of osteoglossomorphs.

Greenwood PH: Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph fishes. Bull Brit Mus Nat Hist (Zool.). Google Scholar.

Greenwood PH: Hyoid and ventral gill arch musculature in osteoglossomorph Brit Mus Nat Hist (Zool.)Greenwood PH: Notes on the anatomy and classification of elopomorph fishes.

Bull Br Mus Nat Hist (Zool.)Tchernavin VV: Six specimens of Lyomeri in the British. This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation.

Hyoid bone, U-shaped bone situated at the root of the tongue in the front of the neck and between the lower jaw and the largest cartilage of the larynx, or voice box.

The primary function of the hyoid bone is to serve as an attachment structure for the tongue. any chondrification has set in, there are separate hyoid and pseudohyoid bars, and even if the ventral and ray-bearing cartilage of the hyoid arch of Eays be termed the hyoideum (as by Edgeworth), it is quite incorrect to say that it and the hyomandibula are formed by the separation of the lower and upper parts of one and the same hyoid bar.

Springer, V.G. & Johnson, G.D. () Study of the dorsal gill-arch musculature of teleostome fi shes, with special reference to the Actinopterygii. Bull. The hyoid bones.

Basihyoid - Unpaired bone. Stylohyoid - Articulates with base of skull at the petrus temporal. A paired bone. Epihyoid - A paired bone. Keratohyoid - A paired bone. Thyrohyoid - Articulates with the thyroid cartilage of the larynx.A paired bone. Species Differences. The stylohyoid muscle grows from the second arch and, hence, it’s supplied by the facial nerve.

Activities. It pulls the hyoid bone upwards and backwards and elongates the floor of the mouth. The stylohyoid muscle is regarded as the delaminated portion of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle.

Mylohyoid Muscle. The little talked about hyoid bone is a unique part of the human skeleton for a number of reasons. First, it's mobile.

This means that other than its attachment site to the thyroid cartilage, which is part of the larynx and discussed below, it floats. You can even move your hyoid from side to side—for safety's sake, very gently—by lightly touching either end and then alternating an ever so.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk.

Full text of "Study of the dorsal gill-arch musculature of teleostome fishes, with special reference to the Actinopterygii". The hyoid bone is a U-shaped bone that is held in place by the strap muscles of the anterior triangle of the neck.

The bone has a central body (forming the center of the “U”) with two smaller protruding structures on the superior surface (lesser horns) and. The hyoid apparatus (Figures and ) is composed of several small bones, the phylogenetic remnants of some of the gill arches in sits in the throat at the base of the tongue and supports the tongue and laryngeal muscles.

It is composed of a median bar, the basihyoid or body, which is oriented transversely at the anterior end of the larynx.

A series of pharyn- geal pouches form between the arches and all except the first pouch open to the surface to form the gills (see Chapter 9). The first and second visceral arches are the mandibular arch and the hyoid arch; they are associated with the muscles of the jaw and of the hyoid apparatus, respectively.

The hyoid is a "horseshoe-shaped" bone that serves as a structural anchor in the is the only bone in the human body that does not directly articulate with another bone (other than sesamoids).).

It is a place of convergence of multiple small neck muscles that permit the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. The suprahyoid muscles are a group of four muscles, located superiorly to the hyoid bone of the neck.

They all act to elevate the hyoid bone – an action involved in swallowing. The arterial supply to these muscles is via branches of the facial artery, occipital artery and lingual artery. In this article, we shall look at the anatomy of the suprahyoid muscles – their attachments, actions.

The infrahyoid muscles are a group of four muscles that are located inferiorly to the hyoid bone in the neck. They can be divided into two groups: Superficial plane – omohyoid and sternohyoid muscles.; Deep plane – sternothyroid and thyrohyoid muscles.; The arterial supply to the infrahyoid muscles is via the superior and inferior thyroid arteries, with venous drainage via the.The hyoid bone sits in the ventrosuperior neck suspended from the styloid process of the temporal bone by the stylohyoid ligament.

It provides attachment to many muscles in this region. It consists of five elements - a body and bilateral lesser and greater cornua.

The body is the rectangular ventral element that sits in the transverse plane.